Tag: France

Exemestane Has Mild Side Effects Can Prevent Breast Cancer

Exemestane has a good tolerability, has mild side effects. The Common side-effects including hot flashes, nausea, insomnia, depression, headaches, dizziness, pain, rash, abdominal pain, anorexia, vomiting, depression, hair loss, body or lower extremity edema, constipation and indigestion. Exemestane is an effective steroidal aromatase inactivator with superior tolerability, safety and efficacy in the adjuvant, neo-adjuvant and metastatic therapy of breast cancer. Exemestane is used for adjuvant treatment after tamoxifen treatment. The post-menopausal women patients with advanced breast cancer can accept such treatment.

Clinical trials show that the standard dose of exemestane is 25mg daily, There are 7.4% of patients give up treatment because of side effects In an interview with tamoxifen and exemestane adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer patients. The most commonly reported adverse reactions were hot flashes (22%), arthralgia (18%) and fatigue (16%). There are 2.8% of the patients appear side effects In all patients with advanced breast cancer. The most commonly reported adverse reactions were hot flashes (14%) and nausea (12%). Most Exemestane side effects is a normal pharmacology response (hot flushes), Because estrogen is blocked. Exemestane treatment for advanced breast cancer patients Rare with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia report. There are 20% of patients with episodic lymphopenia, Particularly past history of lymphopenia, but these patients had no symptoms of viral infection. There is no Exemestane side effect report in the treatment of early breast cancer.

Overall, exemestane has a good tolerability, with mild to moderate side effects. In the IES study, The rate of patients discontinued treatment is 6.3% of exemestane, Tamoxifen group was 5.1%. Although women may get the health from two new drugs, 4% of women taking these two drugs. Exemestane has no side effects than either drug. Subjects were 4560 postmenopausal women from Canada, the United States, France and Spain. Half of them taking exemestane, After three years, researchers found that only 11 of these people who suffer from breast cancer, without taking the drug have 32 people suffering from breast cancer. Exemestane can prevent breast cancer, The drug has been in the domestic market. If the people without breast cancer take exemestane before can reduce 60% the risk of breast cancer. Exemestane is an effective steroidal aromatase inactivator with superior tolerability, safety and efficacy in the adjuvant, neo-adjuvant and metastatic therapy of breast cancer.

Medicine In The Middle Ages

Learning is a continuing process and through new discoveries and invention we broaden our horizon of knowledge everyday. Throughout history man has illuminated the world with art, science, and philosophy and has also acquired abilities to invent and discover, various tools for its survival. One of the most powerful discoveries ever made is the knowledge of medicine. Though history of medicine can be traced back to the primitive age, medicine as a specialized field of study did not exit before the middle Ages. Based on Greek and eastern principles, European medicine embellished with the discoveries of the middle ages and set the foundation for the contemporary medicine.

The Heptameron by Marguerite de Navarre is a representation of the French society in the middle ages. She has depicted various social and cultural norms of the time in the stories. Her insight into the science of medical practiced in France in the Middle Ages is quite apparent Even though the importance of medicine as specialty was acknowledged among the intellectuals of Paris; the influence of the church remained a conduit for its advancement. Although the supremacy of supernatural over natural was obvious, a clear implication was established that the natural and supernatural world was separate if not independent. As a result what we see is an amalgamation of medical science, mysticism and religion in the middle age France.

Ancient physiologists believed that the body must always have a balance of these humors, for imbalance will cause ailments. Diagnosis was based on examining sample of blood and also colors of skin, urine and feces.

Medical treatment by trained physicians rare and very expensive as a result the elite class could only afforded it. The uncertainty and unavailability of academic treatment left no choice for the general population, but to turn towards certain charms, special prayers and specific Christian rituals. Thirteen century Paris had only a half dozen doctors in public employ, with little time to spend on individual patients. Practice of medicine was not restricted to a certain sect of people rather clergy and laymen, men and women were all able to practice medicine.

The physician often compounded and dispensed drugs in addition to practicing medicine. And apothecary often engaged in medical practice as well as compounding and dispensing. It is evident from the stories in heptameron that the drugs made by apothecaries could be very lethal at times as they did not have the proper knowledge. Also personal hygiene was not an important factor for an apothecary, live alone the common people.

Diet was thought to be extremely important in the treatment of illness and prescriptions would cover the minutest of details for all sorts of conditions. The greatest general reliance was placed on broths, milk and eggs. Today the importance of diet in medical science is felt extensively. Nutrition as a special branch of study has emerged. Dietitians and nutritionist are there to help physicians in treating patients who needs special diets. Plants and herbs were used in the preparation of digestives, laxatives, emetics, diuretics, diaphoretics, styptics etc. Drugs remain to be the major form of treatments today but with the advanced technology, pharmacology has become one of the leading businesses.

Surgery a last resort advised by a physician but also it was only accessible to the wealthy. Surgery was known to be successful in cases of fistula, hemorrhoids, gangrene and cataracts. Bloodletting was one of the most common forms of surgery and was recommended for fever, inflammation, and a variety of disease condition and ironically for hemorrhages as well. There were three main methods of bloodletting during the middle ages: leeching, venesection and cupping. Among these leeching is still used, though rare as a medical procedure by some physicians. Leeching helps to reduce tissue congestion where arterial input is maintained but venous return is blocked or slowed leeches act as an extra vein to relieve a dangerous build-up of blood. As a result leech therapy is finding its way into numerous reconstructive surgeries such as digit and limb reattachment, skin graft procedure, scalp avulsions, and breast surgeries and even into effective treatment of periorbital hematomas. Anesthesia and pain relievers were available but some of the potions used were lethal in itself. For example the hemlock juice was used, and it could easily cause death.

The diseases that were very common in the Middle Ages were dysentery, jaundices pneumonia, influenza and common cold. This could be largely attributed to the living condition of that time. Rural people largely lived in a one-room structure with a central fire or hearth and a central roof with a small opening which allowed some of the smoke to escape. Homes were dark damp and cold, with minimum sunlight and poor air circulation, a perfect breeding place for germs and bacteria. The climatic conditions and life style of the time with no proper facilities contributed to the lack of personal hygiene as well. It further escalated with population growth in the towns and cities. Also due to lack of advanced techniques, patients often died due to excessive blood loss after a surgery. Today personal hygiene is considered to be a key factor to live a disease free life.

With the latest technologies available infant mortality has reduced and longevity of humans has increased tremendously compared to middle ages. As we benefit from the sophisticated technologies of medical science, it is imperative that we acknowledge the contribution of our predecessors. What we are enjoying today is the fruits from the trees whose seeds were planted by our ancestor.

Will The President’s Job Bill Hurt Healthcare Jobs

In light of President Obama’s recent speech outlining his plan to create jobs, critics on both sides of the isle question whether or not his plan will be helpful or harmful. Even in unlikely sectors like health care, there is speculation that the Obama bill could be a job killing one. According to industry experts, health care is one of the few sectors that have continued to add jobs despite a persistent economic downturn – about 74,000 in 2010. The problem with the Obama bill is its effect on Medicare and Medicaid.

Impact of Cuts on Healthcare Jobs

Of the previously mentioned is 74,000 healthcare jobs added last year, almost 40% were in the field of assisted living. It is a field which accounts for a fair amount of growth in the overall industry as the American population continues to age. Unfortunately, the vast majority of patients who utilize assisted living do so on Medicare and Medicaid dollars. If the President’s plan is successful in cutting spending for Medicare and Medicaid programs, it could jeopardize the health of many assisted living facilities to the point that they will be forced to close.

Causing further concern is the implementation of universal healthcare beginning in 2014. That law, which was signed back in 2010, may also result in drastic cuts in government medical spending. Hospitals all over the country that depend on government funding for a variety of purposes will have to realign their budgets, forcing them to reduce their workforces. It seems as though a perfect storm may be on the horizon that could spell disaster for the healthcare industry.

The Other Side of the Story

On the other hand, some healthcare industry officials don’t believe the jobs bill will have an effect on healthcare jobs – even if Medicare and Medicaid are cut drastically. They cite the fact that people still need healthcare services, whether or not the government helps them pay for them. Resourceful Americans will find a way to get their healthcare and to make sure it’s paid for. And even in cases when that’s not possible, we are not a nation that allows our people to suffer unnecessarily. As long as there are people, there will be healthcare jobs.

Those who take this view point to countries like Germany and France where governments have realized they need to stop spending so much on healthcare. As a result, private enterprises have begun to spring up to fill in the gaps. And they are hiring.

Despite the potentially bumpy road ahead, health care facilities are continuing to add jobs. As mentioned previously, healthcare is one of the few industries that have continued to grow over the last couple of years, and statistics from the federal labor department indicate that the need for workers will only continue to grow over the next 5 to 10 years. Healthcare jobs will always be available; the only question is what types of jobs they will be. Only time will tell.

Dr. Pierre Dupont Has Experience In Dental Business Management

Pierre Dupont DDS has more than a ten year experience in public dental education. He is the producer and host of sixty educative dental health talk-shows and television programs. He is the author of several newspaper articles and lecturer at several educative conferences and presentations for the public. He lectured for numerous associations of dental surgeons and denturists in Canada, France, Asia and South America. He is also the author of Dental Implants, an Illustrated Guide to Dental Implants and the Possibilities They Offer.

A seasoned dental professional, Dr Pierre Dupont dentist has more than twenty years of clinical practice experience. He had been dedicated to providing adults with complete oral rehabilitation including oral implantology, fixed and removable prosthodontics, orthodontics, periodontics, endodontics and aesthetic/general dentistry. He worked in collaboration with a network of 150 dental practitioners and denturists in Quebec and Ontario, giving lectures and on-site coaching in oral implant surgery and prosthodontics and in practice development.

Pierre Dupont dental surgeon has served as a Scientific Consultant for the quarterly oral implantology journal, Implantodontie, France. He was on staff at the “Socit Franaise des Biomatriaux et Systmes Implantables” (S.F.B.S.I), in the program for the Degree in Biomaterials and Implant Systems offered by Universit de Bordeaux II, France. He has been associated with several professional associations. From 1981-2003, he was member of the Ordre des dentistes du Qubec. He has membership of the International Association for Orthodontics, Academy of Osseointegration and Canadian Society of Oral Implantology. He was a fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry and of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists.

Pierre Dupont dentist has extensive educational background. He did his Doctorate in Dental Medicine from Universit Laval Qubec from 1977-1981. He received certificate in orthodontic studies from International Association for Orthodontics Montral and certificate in implant surgery and prosthodontics from Brnemark Clinic Gteborg. He went to Universit de Bordeaux II to receive degree in biomaterials and implant systems, and Misch Implant Institute to earn certificate in implant surgery and prosthodontics. He is also the holder of certificate in implant surgery and bone surgery from the Universit de Lille, France. He has earned a respectable name in the medical sector.